Category : Faculty & Staff Development

Written on Feb, 15, 2017 by in

We’ve explained how our CTL is guided by a principle we call the law of organizational entropy—when everybody is in charge, nobody is in charge. The obvious foundation for such a law is another law about the importance of organization in itself. Several years ago, AT&T built an advertising campaign around the slogan “The system is the solution.” We have …

Continue Reading...
Written on Feb, 08, 2017 by in

Periodically we run across, in various fields from religion to education, a principle from organizational psychology that while often rendered in slightly different form states, “When everybody is in charge, no one is in charge.” Since we can find no attribution or source, we have dubbed it the Law of Organizational Entropy. An Explanation What does such a fancy name …

Continue Reading...
Written on Feb, 01, 2017 by in

In our favorite film comedy of all time, Back to School (1986), a classroom scene highlights the difference between an ivory-tower econ instructor and Rodney Dangerfield’s street-wise and realistic non-traditional student. After describing a theoretical construct, Professor Barbay asks his class where do we build this factory, and Dangerfield’s Thornton Melon wryly responds, “How about fantasyland?” Dangerfield’s commentary pretty much …

Continue Reading...
Written on Jan, 25, 2017 by in

When should a CTL take on additional duties? Throughout this blog’s history we have continually addressed the subject of what responsibilities should register on a CTL’s strategic plan. To sum up, a CTL’s duties: Should reflect the university’s strategic plan. Should be aligned with the wishes of the administrator directly up the chain of command—i.e., the boss. Should be doable …

Continue Reading...

Over the past decade blogs have proliferated on the Internet. Among those are the academic blog, which has all kinds of subgenres. We have a colleague, for instance, who regularly posts items about the political forces involved in our state’s higher education institutions—e.g., individual institutions, the Commonwealth’s legislature and its committees, the working of the state school board, and even …

Continue Reading...
Written on Dec, 21, 2016 by in

Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) already play a large part in our faculty development program. Usually the semester after they finish, PLCs are invited to present a workshop in our Teaching & Learning Center wherein they provide faculty with some of their discoveries from the previous semester. In a normal semester we sponsor a minimum of three PLCs, but we find …

Continue Reading...
Written on Dec, 14, 2016 by in

According to Beach, Sorcinelli, Austin, and Rivard in Faculty Development in the Age of Evidence (2016), at the top of their list of “Directors [of CTLs] Signature Series by Institutional Type” is New Faculty Orientation [NFO] with 36% of institutions (p. 60), yet on their list of “Top Issues Faculty Development Should Address in the Next Five Years,” NFO falls …

Continue Reading...
Written on Dec, 07, 2016 by in

As long as we’ve been writing blog posts on faculty development, we’ve been stressing the importance of innovating on the fly, of being willing to use the design thinking process of creating low-resolution solutions or implementing an idea before it’s fully fleshed out. One constant to which we often return is the Faculty Innovators (FIs), our select group of higher …

Continue Reading...
Written on Nov, 29, 2016 by in

In the past few years we have found ourselves writing about a book per semester. This semester, however, we’ve done at least two. We say at least because we’ve always got more than one going, and whereas the semester has a definitive end when you are faculty, for writers it never does. When the fall semester started, for instance, we …

Continue Reading...
Written on Nov, 16, 2016 by in

Like a lot of other Centers for Teaching and Learning (CTLs), we remain convinced that today’s faculty do not receive the necessary pedagogic training in graduate school and thus professional development is necessary. However, since we live in evidence-driven times, how do we prove our hypothesis? While we have yet to perform a national study, we have started assessing our …

Continue Reading...