Category : Scholarly Writing & Research

Written on Jan, 18, 2017 by in

While blogging has certainly matured, the concept of academic blogging still conjures up, in the eyes of some, images of professors in pajamas whining about early classes, unprepared students, inattentive administrators, and the cold and cruel world of publishing. Yet, in an era of increased academic accountability, higher education bloggers are looking to promotion and tenure committees for respect and …

Continue Reading...

Over the past decade blogs have proliferated on the Internet. Among those are the academic blog, which has all kinds of subgenres. We have a colleague, for instance, who regularly posts items about the political forces involved in our state’s higher education institutions—e.g., individual institutions, the Commonwealth’s legislature and its committees, the working of the state school board, and even …

Continue Reading...
Written on Sep, 14, 2016 by in

In an earlier blog I began to provide a few tips for publishing. As noted earlier, I have edited a journal since 2001. This is a continuation of that blog (https://newforums.com/editors-perspective-tips-publishing/ ). The journal I edit, Armed Forces & Society is in the middle of the Journal Citation Index – just the sort of journal a new assistant professor or …

Continue Reading...
Written on Aug, 31, 2016 by in

A few years ago, a friend of ours in the University’s College of Education submitted materials to his departmental Promotion, Tenure, and Evaluation Committee, but because the bulk of his scholarship consisted of a continuing blog he wrote on K-12 education problems, the Committee found it difficult to evaluate his scholarship, for it didn’t fit conveniently into the established categories. …

Continue Reading...
Written on Dec, 02, 2014 by in

The future is an interesting place where we can dream, envision, muse, and create exciting utopian worlds that may one day come to pass. So let me share my vision for the future with you. I envision that universities and colleges will build Graduate Centers for Scholarship, which will be staffed by dissertation experts, mentors, statisticians, qualitative and quantitative methods …

Continue Reading...
Written on Nov, 11, 2014 by in

Did you know that enrollment of Black/African American and Latina/o doctoral students comprised approximately 11.5% and 6.1% correspondingly of enrollments in 2007? Yet, despite that, … Only 6% of Black/African American students and 3% of Latina/o students were awarded doctoral degrees in that same year (Gildersleeve, Croom & Vasquez, as cited in Bacon, 2014, p.7)? Why should this matter to …

Continue Reading...
Written on Oct, 23, 2014 by in

The New Forums title, Professors as Writers, has stood the test of time as an invaluable aid to scholarly writers. Author Robert Boice prepared this self-help manual for professors who want to write more productively, painlessly, and successfully. It reflects the author’s two decades of experiences and research with professors as writers — by compressing a lot of experience into …

Continue Reading...
Written on Oct, 09, 2014 by in

I recently spoke with an author whose manuscript had just been accepted for publication in the Journal of Faculty Development. He was very happy to hear the news because he needed more publications for his promotion/tenure dossier. However, his comments clearly indicated that he had little idea about the process of manuscript reviews or the role of the editor who …

Continue Reading...
Written on Sep, 25, 2014 by in

It’s common for students to encounter problems when applying theory in a thesis or dissertation. This is often because they are unable see the connection between the smaller theories needed for their project and the big theories they learned in class. Yet, if theory is a tool we should be able to find it in unlikely places – like on the …

Continue Reading...
student anxiety

Students are usually confused by theory because most of their experience with theory has been in the classroom where “Big” theories were presented. In the classroom they are introduced to theories or “well-substantiated explanations.” Examples might include how market works (law of supply and demand), what motivates student-learning, causes of poverty, why planets rotate around the sun, or how plants …

Continue Reading...